The Air Force Story (1953)

Did I mention that the Internet Archive is an amazing resource? In addition to the thousands of freely and legally downloadable fictional films (I am only scratching the surface in this blog), there are also thousands of documentaries, propaganda, instructional films and other historically interesting items made available by the American government. These include some true classics, such as the Why We Fight series from World War II, but also a good number of lesser known jewels. Today, we take a look at The Air Force Story, a history of the US Air Force produced early in the Cold War.

Boening B-17 Flying Fortress bombers during World War II in The Air Force Story (1953)

There is very little information available about this series of films. No information, not even year of production, is given in the films themselves, except that the music is played by The Air Force Band (which apparently had a male choir as well). The descriptions at the Internet Archive only give keywords for the contents, and the year of release as 1953.

For anyone interested in the history of aviation, though, the series is a gold mine. Here you will find information about and spectacular film sequences of classic military aircraft such as DH-4, JN-4 “Jenny”, B-17 Flying Fortress (image above), P-38 Lightning, B-29 Superfortress and B-36 (image below). Just to mention a handful.

The Air Force Story is at times almost ridiculously detailed, especially the chapters dealing with World War II. When I started watching the series, I thought I was only going to see a handful of chapters; the early ones, the final ones, and some samples from the war years. But the more I saw, the more fascinated I became, and I ended up watching the entire 26(!) episodes.

It is very interesting to watch some of the later episodes after first having watched Victory Through Air Power, since that film describes many of the tactics that were actually used in the war.

The propaganda, fairly light in the early episodes, becomes more and more pronounced the closer one gets to the “present” (i.e. 1950s). Near the end, it actually becomes quite embarrassing, as Hiroshima was said to be a military target (about 50,000 dead civilians as a direct result of the blast and fire).

Here is a list of all the chapters, and links to the Internet Archive for each.

  1. The Beginning
  2. After the War, 1918 – 1923
  3. Struggle for Recognition, 1923 – 1930
  4. Between Wars, 1930 – 1935
  5. Air Power Advances, 1935 – 1937
  6. Prelude to War, 1937 – 1939
  7. The Air War Starts, 1939 – 1941
  8. The Drawing of the Battle Lines, December 1941 – April 1942
  9. The AAF Fights Back, April – July 1942
  10. The Tide Turns, June – December 1942
  11. North Africa, November 1942 – May 1943
  12. Global Operations, 1943
  13. Expanding Air Power, June 1943
  14. Schweinfurt and Regensburg, August 1943
  15. Two Years of War, September – December 1943
  16. Maximum Effort, October 1943
  17. Road to Rome, September 1943 – June 1944
  18. Prelude to Invasion, January – June 1944
  19. D-Day, June 1944
  20. Ploesti, March – August 1944
  21. Superfort, August 1943 – June 1944
  22. Victory in Europe, June 1944 – May 1945
  23. Retreat and Advance, June 1944 – March 1945
  24. Air War Against Japan, 1944 – 1945
  25. A New Air Force, 1945 – 1947
  26. Cold War, 1948 – 1950

Even for an aviation nut like myself, watching the entire series will become tiresome after a while. There is a lot of reiterated propaganda, and some episodes contain relatively little information. If you just want to watch a few parts, I would recommend 1, 2, 3, 4, 9, 19 and 26 for starters. Most other episodes have something to offer, however, and especially if you are interested in World War II.

As if the original 26 parts were not enough, there is also an Air Force Story, Volume 2 from a few years later (chapters 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8; chapter 2 appears to be unavailable). I have not decided whether I will watch that, too.

This series is best enjoyed if you are interested in military history. It must be remembered at all times that this is propaganda, but though some details may be left out or exaggerated, the overall story reflects true events, and it is told in an interesting way. Most important, however, is the huge amount of unique film material used for the series, much of which is publicly available nowhere else.

Convair B-36 Peacemaker bombers during the Cold War in The Air Force Story (1953)

The Air Force Story
Download link (Chapter 1)
Year: 1953
Running time: 6 h 10 min
Image quality: Acceptable
Resolution: Medium (720×540)
Sound quality: Acceptable
Best file format: MPEG2

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