20,000 Leagues Under the Sea (1916)

There is a certain amount of confusion about which was the world’s first feature-length science fiction film. Partly, perhaps, because it is not always very clear where to draw the border between what is and what is not science fiction.

Wikipedia, along with several other sources, claim for instance that the first ever science fiction feature film was Metropolis (1927), but then in the same article mentions several earlier films. (Here we see some disadvantages of community editing without an overseeing editor, but that is a discussion for another time.)

Edna Pendleton, Dan Henlon, Allen Holubar and Ned Land in Jules Verne's 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea (1916)

The earliest one mentioned in that article, and one which is often mentioned in other soruces, is the 1916 adaptation of Jules Verne’s 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea. A splendid novel, which was one of my childhood favourites.

The film is unique not only because it was early science fiction, but also because it was the first feature film that used underwater photography, showing “actors” in spectacular diving suits. The divers move slowly and clumsily, but the coolness factor is enormous. It was also one of the first ever submarine films.

This film is best enjoyed for its historical significance. Due to its age, it has a number of faults, such as the blackened face of Captain Nemo. Still, it is a good effort for its time, and for sci-fi fans in general and Jules Verne fans in particular, it is a cinematic milestone.

Divers in diving suits in Jules Verne's 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea (1916)

20,000 Leagues Under the Sea
Download link
Year: 1916
Running time: 1 h 40 min
Director: Stuart Paton
Stars: Dan Hanlon, Allen Holubar
Image quality: Acceptable
Resolution: Medium (640×480)
Soundtrack: Excellent; synchronised with the images
Sound quality: Excellent
Best file format: Cinepack (678 M)

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