Great Expectations (1946)

There is definitely a tangible difference between British and American film from the 1930s and 40s. A difference that can be seen in almost everly little detail. Cutting, acting, plotting, lighting, you name it. Which one you prefer is perhaps a matter of taste, but I personally have a very soft spot for the British variety.

Tony Wager in Great Expectations (1946)

David Lean’s Great Expectations is an excellent example. Based on the Charles Dickens novel of the same title (which is also available at the Internet Archive), it tells the story of young Pip. Orphaned and brought up by his brother-in-law the blacksmith, he eventually becomes the protégé of an anonymous benefactor, who helps to pay for his learning to become a gentleman in London.

In his childhood, Pip had come to Miss Havisham’s house to be the playmate of the haughty but beautiful Estella. When Pip, the adult gentleman, is called upon to visit Miss Havisham, he again meets Estella, and his youthful love for her is rekindled.

This is only a small sample of the wonderful story, which in turn is a shortened version of Dickens’ original. It is really a beautifully executed adaptation, and well deserving of the two Academy Awards it received.

This film is best enjoyed if you love old mansions and 19th century costumes. As a historical drama, it has few equals from its time.

John Mills and Valerie Hobson in Great Expectations (1946)

Great Expectations
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Year: 1946
Running time: 1 h 53 min
Director: David Lean
Stars: John Mills, Valerie Hobson
Image quality: Good
Resolution: Medium (688×519)
Sound quality: Good
Best file format: Cinepack (1.5 G)

The Phantom Fiend (1932)

Last week, I wrote about Alfred Hitchcock’s most famous silent film, The Lodger – A Story of the London Fog. Hitchcock was to return many times to the themes he started to explore in that film, but never again to that particular story. Others were to do so in his place, and it was remade in sound several times, the first as early as 1932, titled simply The Lodger. In America, it was released with the title The Phantom Fiend, and that version is available at the Internet Archive, as well as many other online movie sites.

Ivor Novello and Elizabeth Allan in The Phantom Fiend / The Lodger (1932)

Ivor Novello reprised his role as the lodger who may or may not be a serial killer in a foggy and shadowy London. The overall story is exactly the same as in Hitchcock’s version, but some details differ. One of them is that Novello invested some of himself into his character. This time, the lodger, just like Novello in real life, is a musician and a composer.

Director Maurice Elvey was no Hitchcock. Even though he does retain or copy some of the expressionistic elements of the original, his film is not at all as sinister or visually dramatic. But this version has other qualities. The added dialogue together with a very good script, co-written by Ivor Novello himself, gives this film much more depth in its character portraits, and the overall plot feels more rounded and developed than in Hitchcock’s version. Which version you prefer is a matter of taste. Personally, I like both, but of course Hitchcock is always Hitchcock.

Curiously, the endings are quite different in the two versions. One might argue that neither ending is entirely satisfactory, or that they complement each other. Either way, it is interesting to compare the two.

This film is best enjoyed in its original (and considerably rarer) British release. The American cut available at the Internet Archive is unfortunately compressed by almost a half hour, something which is painfully obvious on occasion. But if you do not have access to the original, then you can still enjoy this short version and Ivor Novello’s magnetic screen personality.

Ivor Novello playing the violin in The Phantom Fiend / The Lodger (1932)

The Phantom Fiend
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Year: 1932
Running time: 1 h 2 min
Director: Maurice Elvey
Stars: Ivor Novello
Image quality: Acceptable
Resolution: Medium (720×480)
Sound quality: Poor
Best file format: MPEG4 (600 M)

The Lodger – A Story of the London Fog (1927)

I think it is safe to say that Alfred Hitchcock is best remembered today for his many suspenseful horror films and drama thrillers. His production of silent films is considerably less well-known, though some of them are not bad at all. In the 1920s, he was still perfecting his genius, but the fantastic storytelling skills can clearly be seen even in these early works. This is especially true of The Lodger – A Story of the London Fog.

Ivor Novello in Alfred Hitchcock's The Lodger - A Story of the London Fog (1927)

The Lodger was in fact the first film (as well as the only silent) in which Hitchcock developed his favourite theme: that of someone accused of a terrible crime and fleeing from justice. The police is investigating a series of murders in an area of London when a young man appears, seeking lodging with an elderly couple. The couple has a beautiful daughter, who is a perfect match for the muderer’s victims. They soon start to suspect that the young man may in fact be the killer, but they need evidence.

In my opinion, Hitchcock succeeds even better here than in many later films, such as The 39 Steps (1935) or Young and Innocent (1937), in upholding the suspense. Up until a few minutes from the end, the audience is never quite sure whether the protagonist is guilty or not.

Of all the films in Hitchcock’s output, this is perhaps the one that most clearly shows his debt to German Expressionism. A few years previously, he had been present during the filming of the great expressionist F.W. Murnau’s masterpiece Der letzte Mann (1924), and the influence can be clearly seen here.

The Lodger was not only Hitchcock’s first suspense thriller, but also the first film where he made his famous cameo appearance. The reason is said to have been that he had to fill in for an extra who did not show up. The cameo is so hard to spot that there is no way I would have seen it if I had not known beforehand where to look, but if you want some sport you can try to spot him for yourself.

This film is best enjoyed by Hitchcock enthusiasts who want to explore the master’s early work, but it has quite unfairly fallen into the shadow of Hitchcock’s later production. The Lodger – A Story of the London Fog has many good qualities, and is quite able to stand on its own legs. In the category of silent suspense thriller, it holds up well to the competition. In addition, this was without a doubt the peak of Ivor Novello’s short career in the movies. The film is worth seeing for that reason alone, since he was a fine and unique actor.

Ivor Novello and June Tripp in Alfred Hitchcock's The Lodger - A Story of the London Fog (1927)

The Lodger – A Story of the London Fog
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Year: 1927
Running time: 1 h 10 min
Director: Alfred Hitchcock
Stars: Ivor Novello
Image quality: Acceptable
Resolution: Medium (592×448)
Soundtrack: Excellent; orchestral music synchronised with the images
Sound quality: Excellent
Best file format: MPEG4 (804 M)

Broken Blossoms or The Yellow Man and the Girl (1919)

D. W. Griffith seems a very peculiar character in retrospect. Already an experienced director, he went ahead in 1915 and created one of the greatest classics in the history of cinema, The Birth of a Nation. Though a great financial success, it was justly criticized for racism and falsifying history. So the next year, he made Intolerance, allegedly in response to his critics of the former film. This was another majestic classic, but as for the response over the previous film, it falls flat.

So Griffith could have gone down in history as a racist film maker, but then in 1919, he made yet another of his greatest classics, Broken Blossoms or the Yellow Man and the Girl. Here we find a direct and unequivocal statement against racism and intolerance. Hard to tell what Griffith really thought on the subject; the films are his legacy and still deserve to be watched.

Richard Barthelness and Lilian Gish in Broken Blossoms or The Yellow Man and the Girl (1919)

Broken Blossoms tells the story of poor Lucy, whose father is a brutish and alcoholic boxer. He beats her for any poor excuse and forces her to do all the menial tasks in the household. But then she meets a young Chinese. He is also lonesome and disheartened, and they find that they are soulmates, able to lift each other to happiness neither thought possible. Fortune cannot hold forever, of course, though I will not reveal the ending here.

Lilian Gish, one of Griffith’s favourite actors, plays Lucy. Gish is sometimes mentioned as one of the greatest actresses of the silent era. Well, I am not entirely convinced, but she certainly makes a fine portrait in this particular film. In a time when overacting was the norm, Gish did it more than most. She had a pronounced flair for acting miserable, distressed or frightened, and in this film she has little reason to do anything else. In particular, there is a famous scene where she hides in a closet, while her raving father breaks down the door with an axe. This was the kind of scene where Gish absolutely excelled.

Artisitically, Griffith was perhaps at his peak here. He had a few great films ahead of him, but by the mid 1920s, it became steadily clearer that the man who once revolutionized film making had failed to stay ahead of the pack. Hence, you will find that in some ways the film has not aged well. Even so, its classic status cannot be denied.

This film is best enjoyed when you are in the mood for tragedy. This is not a feel-good movie.

Lilian Gish in Broken Blossoms or The Yellow Man and the Girl (1919)

Broken Blossoms or the Yellow Man and the Girl
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Year: 1919
Running time: 1 h 29 min
Director: D. W. Griffith
Stars: Lilian Gish, Richard Barthelmess
Image quality: Acceptable
Resolution: Medium (512×384)
Soundtrack: Good; synchronized with the images
Sound quality: Acceptable
Best file format: DivX (493 M)